Article

Sample Meal Plans for Feeding Your Baby

baby girl being fed solid food

Need some meal ideas for your baby? Use these sample meal plans for babies 6 to 9 months old and 9 to 12 months old to help you feed your baby.

How much should my baby eat?

Every baby is different. The amount that your baby eats can change from day to day. Your baby may also eat more or less than other babies. Use the sample meals as general guidelines only. Trust your baby to let you know when they are hungry or full. You are responsible for the foods that are offered as well as when and where. Your baby is responsible for if they eat and how much.

Sample Meals for Baby: 6 to 9 months old   

Meal Times   6 to 9 months  
Early morning   Breastmilk or infant formula
Vitamin D drops for breastfed babies
 
Breakfast   Breastmilk or infant formula, iron fortified infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula or water
Mashed fruit like banana or pears mixed with full fat plain yogurt
 
Snack   Breastmilk or infant formula  
Lunch   Breastmilk or infant formula, iron fortified infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula or water
Mashed vegetables (sweet potato, squash or carrots)
Cooked ground beef, chicken, pork or fish
Well-cooked chopped egg or silken (soft) tofu
 
Snack   Breastmilk or infant formula  
Dinner   Breastmilk or infant formula, iron fortified infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula or water
Cooked vegetables (carrots, pieces of soft-cooked green beans or broccoli)
Cooked, minced chicken or turkey or canned or cooked legumes (beans, lentils or peas)
Fruit like unsweetened applesauce, mashed banana or pureed melon mixed with full fat plain yogurt
 
Bedtime snack   Breastmilk or infant formula  


Sample Meals for Baby: 9 to 12 months old 

Mealtimes

9 to 12 months

Early morning

Breastmilk, infant formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk
Vitamin D drops

Breakfast

Iron fortified infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula, 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk or water
Full-fat plain yogurt, unsalted cottage cheese or grated cheese
Cooked chopped egg
Soft fruit (chopped banana, avocado, peach, seedless watermelon, cantaloupe, papaya, plum or kiwi)
Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk

Morning Snack

Strips of whole-grain bread or roti
Grated apple or chopped strawberries
Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk

Lunch

Infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula, 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk or water
Minced or chopped soft-cooked meat (lamb, pork, veal or beef)
Cooked whole wheat pasta, rice or pita bread
Cubed avocado or peeled and chopped cucumber

Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk

Afternoon Snack

Cheese cubes (full fat mozzarella, Swiss or cheddar) with pieces of unsalted whole grain crackers or toast
Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk

Dinner

Infant cereal mixed with breastmilk, formula, 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk or water
Diced or cut up cooked or canned flaked fish or pieces of firm tofu or chicken
Cut up vegetables (soft-cooked green beans, okra, cauliflower, broccoli or carrots)
Soft fruit (chopped banana, ripe peach or mango or quartered grapes)

Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk

Bedtime Snack

Small pieces of whole grain toast, bread, crackers or unsweetened dry O-shaped cereal
Breastmilk, formula or 3.25% homogenized whole cow’s milk


Babies and High Mercury Fish

Children under the age of one should eat less than 40 grams (1.4 oz) of canned white (albacore) tuna, frozen or fresh tuna, shark, swordfish, marlin, orange roughy and escolar per month. These fish are high in mercury.

Key points when feeding your baby

  • Continue to breastfeed on demand. Offer solid foods with breastmilk or formula feedings or in between as snacks.
  • Offer food 2-3 times a day and work towards 3-5 times a day.
  • Start with iron-rich foods like meat and fish, well-cooked chopped eggs, tofu and iron fortified cereals. After iron-rich foods introduce vegetables, fruit, other cereals and grains, full fat cheese and yogurt.
  • Try a small amount such as 1 tsp (5 mL). If your baby wants more food, give them more.
  • Start with soft foods that have been pureed, mashed, minced or ground. Offer a variety of textures no later than 9 months.
  • Always supervise your baby and cut foods into small pieces to avoid choking.
  • Offer one new food at time. If you are concerned about food allergies, introduce one food per day with a two-day period in between. 
  • Once your baby is 9 to 12 months old and is eating a variety of iron-rich foods every day, you can offer 3.25% homogenized whole milk in a regular cup.
  • By 12 months your child should be eating most of the foods (mashed, minced, lumpy, ground and soft) that are prepared for family meals. Your baby can enjoy the same herbs, spices and flavours as the rest of the family.

Bottom Line

Every baby is different when it comes to learning to eat solid foods. It may take many tries before your child accepts them. Offer food without pressure. You are responsible for what foods that are offered as well as when and where. Your baby is responsible for if they eat and how much. 
 
If you have questions or concerns, talk to your health care provider or dietitian.

You may also be interested in:

Introducing Solids to Your Baby: Safety Tips
Transitioning Your Baby From Breastmilk to Cow’s Milk
All About Homemade Baby Food
All About Store Bought Baby Food
 

Last Update – September 8, 2019

Phone Icon

Dietitians look beyond fads to deliver reliable, life-changing advice. Want to unlock the potential of food? Connect with a dietitian.